Ministry and Technology Forum Paper #4

This summer I’m taking Wycliffe’s Ministry and Technology course online. Every two weeks we’re to write a 1000-word response to a given prompt that we have first worked through in discussion forums, and submit that response for grading. There is no requirement to share these papers online, but I thought I’d post my thoughts anyways. (“Course notes” refers to Dr. Power’s online required reading. “Class discussion forum” was the text discussion, and “zoom discussion” was the video conversation.)

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Ministry and Technology Forum Paper #3

This summer I’m taking Wycliffe’s Ministry and Technology course online. Every two weeks we’re to write a 1000-word response to a given prompt that we have first worked through in discussion forums, and submit that response for grading. There is no requirement to share these papers online, but I thought I’d post my thoughts anyways. (“Course notes” refers to Dr. Power’s online required reading.)

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Up now at St. Stephen’s: Around the Table blog

Just a brief note: I’ve been volunteering on the ministry team at St. Stephen’s, Maple here in the Diocese of Toronto. I took the lead on adapting the website to The Circumstances and I’m grateful for the opportunity to offer that valuable ministry at this time.

One of the new things we’re doing is a weekly blog called Around the Table, which, among other things, is meant to interact with the readings for the upcoming Sunday.

My first contribution to the blog, for Trinity Sunday, is available here. Enjoy, and may the Love of the Triune God fill your hearts and minds.

Divine Mercy

Our Roman Catholic siblings have added an extra layer to this past Sunday’s liturgy. With us they celebrate the Second Sunday of Easter, replete with white vestments, alleluias, the appearances to the disciples (including Thomas) for the Gospel, and all the accouterments that mark our 50-day focus on the resurrection of Jesus. But a more recent tradition reminds us that we just marked His crucifixion as well; it doesn’t let us scoot by it and on to happier things, as if we could ignore our giant elephant roommate that is the passion and death that led to God’s Easter reply.

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Proclaiming the Resurrection in a Strange Land

For many of us, it feels like the celebration of Our Lord’s resurrection is a distant memory from years past. This weekend just wasn’t the same: it can’t compare to gathering in a packed church, singing hymns, hearing and proclaiming the Word, consecrating and partaking of the Sacrament.

And yet, celebrate we can, because Christ’s rising from the dead is truer than a pandemic, and truer than our isolation. The risen Jesus makes room for our feelings of disorientation and disconnection within His eternal, glorified life.

And so the Monastery that is the Church moves with the patterns of this eternal life, in time with the flow of Christ’s story, even with one eye on the trends and patterns of death and disease in our own cities and communities. The People of God continue to gather and pray, but we’ve moved primarily into digital spaces. We continue to share our lives, invite others into our lives, and hopefully make good on the opportunity to reflect on what is and isn’t meaningful for our human, creaturely existence.

Even in a time of pandemic and physical distancing, we can still journey with Jesus, who carries us “out of error into truth, out of sin into righteousness, out of death into life.”

Alleluia, Christ is risen.
The Lord is risen indeed, alleluia.

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